Day schools Halifax 2019/20

I’m delighted to say that the Calderdale Industrial Museum, Square Road, Halifax, HX1 1QG is hosting the History Jar day schools in the academic year 2019/2020.

calderdale-industrial-museum-logo.pngSituated near to Halifax railway station and the Eureka children’s museum, and next door to the newly renovated Piece Hall, the new central Library and Archive, and Square Chapel, Calderdale Industrial Museum is well placed for people travelling by public transport as well as car.

Access is to the side of the Museum via their newly installed ramp and stairs, internally there are stairs and a lift to all floors.  

http://calderdaleindustrial.co.uk/contact-and-find/

 

 

1)   Elfrida: the first crowned queen of England

AngloSaxonslatest-700x390.pngWednesday 25thSeptember 2019

10.00 am – 3.30pm

King Edgar fell in love with and then married Elfrida, having her crowned in Bath a his consort. Unfortunately Elfrida’s first husband had to be disposed of prior to her marriage to Edgar. There was also the small matter of Edgar’s wife – a former nun. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dunstan, was not amused.

Elfrida went on to be described as a protectoress of nunneries but at the same time is suspected as having conspired to murder her step-son, King Edward. She ruled as regent for her own young son – Ethelred – for six years before he began to select his own advisors and distance himself from his mother.   Meet Dunstan of Canterbury, Ethelred the Unready and Edward the Martyr. Discover some lurid Saxon scandals and consider the role of queens as mediators between the Crown and the individual.

Elfrida The first crowned queen of England

A History Jar day school Wednesday 25th September 2019 10.00 am – 3.30pm at the Calderdale Industrial Museum. Course hand outs provided.

£20.00

 

 

2)  Sons of the Conqueror: struggle for power

king-william-rufus-william-ii-house-of-normandy-1087-1100-1351385894_bWednesday 23th October 2019

10.00 am – 3.30pm

The end of William the Conqueror’s life was marred by the rebellion of his oldest son, Robert Curthose, who eventually inherited Normandy. Matilda, William’s wife secretly supported her oldest son – the rift in the family was described with some bitterness by the Conqueror even though the quarrel was eventually resolved.

William died on the 9thSeptember 1087.  It wasn’t long before his three sons – Robert Curthose, William Rufus and Henry – were quarrelling over their inheritance. The division of William’s kingdom caused difficulties for his barons and rebellion on both sides of the Channel as men were required to decide where their loyalties lay.

William Rufus was murdered in the New Forest. Robert Curthose lost the Battle of Tinchebray and spent the rest of his life in captivity. William’s youngest son Henry who had not inherited a kingdom became ruler of Normandy and England in their stead.  Known as ‘Beauclerc’ or the ‘Lion of Justice’ he had more than twenty illegitimate children but only one legitimate son whose death resulted in the so-called Anarchy.

Sons of the Conqueror: struggle for power

A History Jar day school. Wednesday 23th October 2019 10.00 am – 3.30pm at the Calderdale Industrial Museum. Handouts provided.  

£20.00

3) Harry of Hereford, Lancaster and Derby Am I: who ready here do stand in arms. The life of Henry IV.

Henry IVWednesday 27th November 2019

10.00 am – 3.30pm

 

 

 

 

Henry of Bolingbroke, the eldest son of John of Gaunt rebelled against his cousin Richard II siding with the Lords Appellant in a bid to curb his cousin’s power. When Richard took his vengeance Henry deposed his cousin and made himself king of  England.

His reign was filled with rebellion, religious turmoil,  the renewal of war with France and suspicion of plots. In Wales Owain Glyndwr rose up against the English and in Northumberland, the Percy family tried three times to unseat Henry IV having initially supported his bid for the throne

Find out about Henry’s dramatic first marriage to Mary de Bohun and his second wife Joan of Navarre not to mention the familial difficulties that beset Henry and his heir.

Rebel, Teutonic knight, pilgrim, usurper, king and “leper” – Henry’s ambition saw him hang on to the reins of power, founding the Lancastrian dynasty of kings of England.

Harry of Hereford, Lancaster and Derby Am I: who ready here do stand in arms. The life of Henry IV.

A History Jar day school on Wednesday 27th November 2019 10.00 am – 3.30pm in the Calderdale Industrial Museum. Hand outs provided.

£20.00

4) The many faces of  William Shakespeare.

Shakespeare_Droeshout_1623Wednesday 18th  March 2020

10.00 am -3.30 pm

Did Shakespeare really write Shakespeare?

The son of illiterate parents who left school when he was thirteen William Shakespeare is an elusive figure in history. Mark Twain observed that no one could prove that Shakespeare had actually written anything.

 

During the day we will look at the historical evidence of Shakespeare’s life and explore some of the alternative candidates for the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays including Francis Bacon,  the 5thEarl of Rutland and his wife, the Earl of Oxford, the Earl of Derby, Christopher Marlowe and others including Robert Cecil, Queen Elizabeth I,  King James I and Sir Walter Raleigh. Conspiracy theories,  snobbery and myths abound as do forgeries, codes and academic dispute.

The many faces of William Shkespeare

A History Jar day school Wednesday 18th March 2020 10.00am -3.30 pm at the Calderdale Industrial Museum. Handouts provided.

£20.00

5) Bess!  From squire’s daughter to Countess of Shrewsbury

Wednesday 29th April 2020

10.00 am -3.30 pm

 

bessofhardwickBess of Hardwick is almost as famous as Elizabeth I for her mansion in Derbyshire and for her rise from modest beginnings.  She married not once but four times into money, founded the Cavendish dynasty, acquired land and aspired for her grand daughter, Arbella Stuart, to rule England.  She became embroiled in the scandal of Lady Katherine Grey’s marriage; one of her brother-in-laws plotted to murder her an successfully murdered her third husband; she was on friendly terms with Elizabeth’s leading courtiers and Mary Queen of Scots helped to destroy her fourth marriage to the Earl of Shrewsbury.  Meet this remarkable and fascinating woman and discover more about her marriages, rivalries and loyalties.

Bess! From squire’s daughter to Countess of Shrewsbury

A History Jar day school. Wednesday 29th April 2020 10.00am -3.30 pm at the Calderdale Industrial Museum. Handouts provided.

£20.00

 

6) The Favourite:  Queen Anne fact and fiction

queen-anne-1665-1714Wednesday 20th May 2020

10.00 am -3.30 pm

Whilst the antics depicted in the library of Oscar winning film The Favourite aren’t completely out of  the question, the reality of Queen Anne’s relationship with Sarah Churchill and Abigail Masham was a power struggle that ended in personal recriminations that impacted on the domestic and foreign policy of the country.

The last Stewart monarch finally achieved the union between England and Scotland that her grand father and great grandfather had desired not to mention some of the most famous European battlefield victories of the period thanks to Churchill but her personal life was one of ill health, personal tragedy and estrangement from her friends, family and long term advisors.

Meet Prince George of Denmark, Mrs Morley and Mrs Freeman,  Lord Godolphin, the Duke of Marlborough as well as assorted Whigs and Tories not to mention a good helping of rumour, gossip and jealousy.

The Favourite:  Queen Anne fact and fiction

A History Jar day school. Wednesday 20th May 2020 10.00am -3.30 pm at the Calderdale Industrial Museum. Handouts provided.

£20.00