Misericords

DSC_0046Misericords from the Latin word meaning pity are also known as ‘mercy seats’.  These are the ledges or rests in choir stalls so that clergy singing the divine offices could rest their weary legs.   The clerical perches were often hinged so the misericord carving could only be seen when the perch was raised. Many oak choir stalls with their misericords were placed in churches during the medieval period; their carvers are largely anonymous and the meaning behind the carvings sometimes lost but they remain a fascinating glimpse of the past.

Hemingborough in Yorkshire has some of the earliest examples of misericords in this country and Exeter Cathedral has a complete set dating from the Thirteenth Century.

The carvers used their imaginations when they created each misericord.  Some scenes come from the Bible; others like the foliate green men sporting leaves from their mouths come from an earlier folklore; some images such as elephants come from medieval bestiaries.  Hyenas were popular because not only were they an exotic species but they had legendary status as well according to Richard Hyman in that they were supposed to disinter and eat corpses…lovely.  In addition they represented “vice feeding on corruption.” (Hyman: 21)  Other inspirations came from everyday life; from animals realistic and fanciful and from mythical creatures such as mermaids.  A carver in Fairford captured a woman raising a ladle to hit her unfortunate spouse  .  In Ludlow a man warms himself in front of his fire and in Manchester a game of backgammon can be spotted.  Less amusingly in Lincoln a knight tumbles from his hours mortally injured.

Sometimes it is possible to spot a carver who has travelled around a locality.  Greystoke Parish Church has some delightful misericords that are matched by similar examples in Dacre and also in Cartmel.  Carlisle Cathedral has some impressive examples as does Hexham Abbey.  Perhaps the man who carved them travelled from one church to the next in search of work.

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Further south Ripon, Richmond and Chester have some intriguing misericords as does Wakefield, Halifax, Gloucester Cathedral, Worcester, Southwell Minster and Ludlow.  In fact these lovely little works of art not only give an insight to medieval craftsmanship and mindset but they can also be alarmingly addictive…you’ve been warned and I’ve not even started on bench ends, corbels, capitals, grotesques and gargoyles.

DSC_0036This misericord from Cartmel depicts a rather alarming two-tailed mermaid with her mirror and comb.  In medieval times a mermaid symbolised lust and temptation.  I’m not sure that the Cartmel mermaid would tempt anyone with that ribcage!

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4 Comments

Filed under Cathedrals, Churches and Chapels

4 responses to “Misericords

  1. You do come up with the most interesting things! I love this post and will now be looking for misericords!

    • JuliaH

      Trust me when I say ‘interesting’ was not the word used by my family when I dragged them around assorted churches, castles and cathedrals during their teen-age years. Though I’d have to say that misericords are fun because lots of the people featured in the carving feel like they might be caricatures of men an women that the carvers knew.

  2. Mavis Armitage

    Hi Julia, there is an interesting collection of misericords in the church in Leintwardine Shropshire said to have come from Wigmore Abbey. But most interestingly there is a modern one carved by a local wood carver representing Flossie who was in her 90’s and the 3rd generation proprietor of The Sun Inn, a parlour pub in the village , now run as a village cooperative. The carving shows her dispensing ale in her parlour which has been preserved as it was. Google Sun Inn Leintwardine for more info!

    Mavis

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • JuliaH

      Thank you – that is definitely going on my itinerary for the summer months. Flossie sounds perfect for a photograph.

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